Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research

Dr. Jan Berend Stuut

Senior Scientist
Phone number
+31 (0)222 369 405
Location
Texel
Department
Ocean Systems (OCS)
Function
Senior Scientist

Expertise

  • Marine geology
  • Sedimentology
  • Desert dust and aeolian sedimentary processes.
  • Paleaclimate reconstructions

Research interests & specialization

I study two main aspects of desert dust:

1) the depositional aspect allows me to study dust dispersal in the geologic past. Just like rivers nearly always flow to the sea and deliver sediments, winds always blow off land masses and deposit dust in the ocean. Using such marine archives of sediment deposition, I try to reconstruct past environmental conditions in dust-source regions.

2) the marine-environmental effects that dust has are most likely enormous. Desert dust contains all kinds of nutrients and metals, from which marine life can profit. In a couple of projects I am trying to answer the question if dust can be used as an artifical fertiliser for the ocean. We think that this is happening in nature, and should this be the case, we could potentially apply it as a means to combat climate change.

Much more information on dust-related studies at NIOZ can be found at the institute's dustiest website at www.nioz.nl/dust .

In addition, we are regularly publishing dusty news in the NIOZ dust-blog

Alternatively, you can find more dusty info on my personal website at: www.stuut.tv

Front of The Australian newspaper showing a beautiful picture of a dust storm.

Linked blogs

Friday 20 October 2017
Saharan dust and Amazon freshwaters cause algal blooms
New findings suggest that both Saharan dust and freshwater from the Amazon may have led to algal blooms in the western equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Those are the conclusions of a new paper published by Catarina Guerreiro and colleagues in the…
Tuesday 17 October 2017
Dust (and smoke) is in the air!
Cyclone Ophelia draws Sahara dust and Iberian smoke to northern Europe
Sunday 10 September 2017
New dust paper published by Carmen Friese
The manuscript by Carmen Friese (MARUM) has now been published as "full" paper in the open-access journal Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics. The paper is entitled: "Seasonal provenance changes in present-day Saharan dust collected in and off…
Saturday 09 September 2017
Expedition M140
Research Expedition M140 onboard FS Meteor took place from 10 August until 5 September 2017 and was dedicated to servicing three sediment-trap mooring stations and surface buoys that have been collecting Saharan dust since we deployed them last year…
Monday 03 July 2017
Haboobs
Dust outbreaks are most often impressive events. One of the most spectacular dust storms is the so-called "haboob". Although initially described in Sudan, Africa, they have also been observed in other dry areas. Last week, a spectacular haboob in…
Thursday 22 June 2017
Australian dust cycle
The Australian dust cycle is a "natural laboratory" for the production of mineral dust. Nowhere else on the planet is the process so clearly visible and chances are that in a few months, huge dust outbreaks will happen again!
Wednesday 14 June 2017
New dust paper by Catarina Guerreiro accepted in Biogeosciences
New dust paper by Catarina Guerreiro accepted for Biogeosciences Discussions
Tuesday 13 June 2017
Saharan dust outbreak
A huge dust outbreak occurred off NW Africa, which was registered by our buoys!
Tuesday 30 May 2017
New dust paper published by Laura Korte
Laura Korte published her very first paper in the open-access journal Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics

NIOZ publications

Linked projects

TRAFFIC_Transatlantic fluxes of Saharan dust
Supervisor
Jan Berend Stuut
Funder
Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research
Project duration
31 Dec 2012 - 31 Dec 2017
DustTraffic: Transatlantic fluxes of Saharan dust: changing climate through fertilising the ocean?
Supervisor
Jan Berend Stuut
Funder
European Community - European Research Council
Project duration
1 Oct 2012 - 30 Sep 2017